Taliesin Live - A Christmas Carol - As told By Jacob Marley (deceased)

Overview:

Brother Wolf presents

A Christmas Carol - As told By Jacob Marley (deceased)

Adapted and performed by James Hyland

Music by Chris Warner

In celebration of the 175th anniversary of Charles Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’, join us this festive season for James Hyland’s award-winning stage adaptation. Told from the perspective of Scrooge’s deceased business partner, this ground-breaking theatrical event has been hailed as the “definitive telling of A Christmas Carol” (Redditch Standard).

Jacob Marley is dead and condemned to an eternity of carrying a heavy chain, forged in life; a life to which he can no longer return except to recount the tale of his miserly business partner, Ebenezer Scrooge, and the path that lead to his redemption. Through Marley’s words, we learn how three magical spirits opened Scrooge’s eyes and made him realise the true value of love and forgiveness.

Recognised by The Queen for its part in Dickensian Scholarship, this “forcefully compelling masterpiece” (Manx Independent) delivers thrills, chills and excitement aplenty for all ages.

Parental discretion advised for children under 7.

"This production shows Hyland to be a rare phenomenon - a virtuoso performer who has mastered the one-man show, able to write, act and produce at the highest level." ★★★★★ ~Tom Dillon, Plays To See

“a work of art, and one that must be seen... thoroughly recommended”                  THE DR BIRD

"chilling, humorous, surprising... Powerful theatre indeed”          THE YORK PRESS

www.jameshyland.co.uk

www.brotherwolf.co.uk

Thursday 20 December 7.30pm    

Prices and Times:

Thu 20th Dec

7.30pm

Pricing Information:

CategoryPrice
Full price:£ 12
Under 18's:£ 10
Full time students:£ 10
Senr.Citizens:£ 10
Other Conc.:£ 10

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WINNER: Best Performer in Theatre (Fringe Report Awards, 2012)

NOMINATED: London Theatre Award (London Awards for Art and Performance, 2012)

 

James Hyland says (November 2009):

"The Victorians were obsessed with, and possessed by, the supernatural in all its various guises: ghosts, fairies, angels and demons, visions of the afterlife and a reality beyond the every day. My objective in adapting 'A Christmas Carol' as a one-man show, told from the point of view of Jacob Marley’s ghost, was to emphasize the differences between a saved soul and one that is lost; Scrooge being the former, and Marley the latter. This contrast serves to highlight the themes of redemption and forgiveness by comparing Marley’s temporary liberation from his chains to that of Scrooge’s full reclamation of spirit; shining a light on the necessities of changing one’s outlook upon life, in regards to acknowledging and taking account for one’s fellow beings as well as adding a certain poignancy to the proceedings since Marley can never really escape his imprisonment and must continue to suffer in death on account of his behaviour in life.

Who better to tell a story of redemption than the spirit who regrets never achieving it for himself? Just as Marley returned to haunt Scrooge, so he returns to haunt us."